Tag Archives: grad school

Will Write for Food

A guy I knew in grad school used to wear a T-shirt with those four words on the front.  Every time he wore it, the rest of us gave knowing chuckles.  The statement aptly captured two assumptions of student life:  meager grocery budget; desperation for payment, any payment, for one’s words. I’ve been thinking a lot about that shirt.  The spirit behind it seems both sincere—a willingness to do what it takes—and ironic.  Food?  You kidding me? What about free?  You kidding me? The debate sprouts up on Facebook, professional writers’ list servs, and heated email chains: when is it … Continue reading

Posted in agents, teaching, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Many Faces of Mollie

When I was in junior high, I wrote stories about a girl named Kim Swanson.  I named her Kim because I wanted a name like “Kim”—popular, cute, perky.  I wanted to fit in, to belong.  “Lindsey” stuck out—I know, it’s a common name now, even a trendy one for a certain age group, but trust me, back then, I was the only Lindsey.  Well, Lindsay Wagner came along a few years later, but that just made for a lot of lame bionic jokes. Kim Swanson attended a girls’ school in New England: Furst’s Girls School, run by a thin gray-haired … Continue reading

Posted in craft, teaching, writing, writing groups | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

If I Gave a Reading in the Forest, and No Tree Fell, Would Anyone Buy a Copy of My Book?*

While in grad school, some seventeen years ago, I taught my first class and gave my first public reading.  Both were nerve-wracking—I practiced for days, reading aloud  from pages marked up with little arrows and accent marks.  You know, slow down, look up, even take a sip.  I’ve always been one for preparation. When the time came, though, once I’d quelled the butterflies and got through it live, I discovered my inner exhibitionist.  After years of being the shy girl, the quiet bookworm, guess what? I loved to talk to a room of people, loved to hear myself read my … Continue reading

Posted in community, faith, spirituality, teaching, Uncategorized, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Two weeks ago, I heard Daniel Coshnear talk on “The Balanced Life.”  It was the final day of UC Berkeley Extension’s Fiction Writing Intensive, and we’d gathered four panelists to talk about Where to Go From Here:  Sustaining the Momentum.  The idea was to give the students – with varying degrees of writing experience – some practical and inspirational ideas for moving their work forward. Mimi Albert, a writer and longtime UC Extension insructor, talked about online classes.   Heather Cameron gave an overview on publishing.  Deborah Lichtman covered the pros and cons of MFA programs.  And Dan talked about making … Continue reading

Posted in craft, teaching, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments